Keyword Search
Free Preview
Login    Register   

Login to your account

No Account Yet? Fields marked with an asterisk (*) are required.

Please enter a valid Username. No spaces, at least 2 characters and must contain only letters and numbers.
Please enter a valid Password. No spaces, at least 4 characters and must contain only letters and numbers.
Passwords do not match.
Please enter a valid e-mail address.
E-mails do not match. ?>


Call for Articles


There is no fee to publish with us.

By purchasing an article in PDF format, you are agreeing to follow our Article Policy.

Use the "Buy Now" button to purchase an article.  Once checkout is complete, a download link will be sent to the email address that you provide during checkout.


Use the KEYWORD search located in the top left column to look for keywords, authors, and titles. If you still can't find what you're looking for, please This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

Development of a Production and Purification Method for Type 5 Adenovirus

by Scott Jendrek, Denise Ekstrom, PhD, Daniel Stoughton, PhD, Sawako Ishikawa, Dexter Poon, PhD, Wei Cheng, Steve Giardina, PhD, and David Mallard
Volume 5, Issue 1 (Spring 2006)

The number of viral vectors designed for gene therapy applications in the cGMP pipeline is staggering. Similar in scope to the flurry of recombinant protein products of the 1980s and the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) of the 1990s, viral vector-based products are surging from research labs and universities into contract manufacturing organizations (CMOs), ultimately destined for use in clinical trials. Unlike recombinant proteins and MAbs, both of which sometimes require grams of vialed final product to start Phase I studies, the amount of material required to move a viral vector-based product into clinical trials can be minute in comparison. Of all the viral vectors currently in clinical trials, more than 25% are based on adenovirus...

Citation:
Jendrek S, Ekstrom D, Stoughton D, Ishikawa S, Poon D, Cheng W, Giardina S, Mallard D. Development of a Production and Purification Method for Type 5 Adenovirus.
BioProcess J, 2006; 5(1): 37-42.

 
Effects of Mutation in Protease on the Production of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Virus-Like Particles

by Bin Li, James Smith, PhD, Salvatore T. Butera, DVM, PhD, and Dennis L. Ellenberger, PhD
Volume 5, Issue 1 (Spring 2006)

As human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) continues to spread around the world, scientists are actively pursuing effective vaccines against the infectious disease that results in AIDS. A number of vaccine designs have been developed, including plasmid DNA constructs encoding HIV proteins. One advantage of DNA vaccination is that after the uptake of the plasmid by the host cells, the encoded antigens are expressed in the native conformation and allow authentic immunological processing of the antigen. Another advantage of DNA vaccines is that they can be repeatedly administered without vector-directed immunity limiting the efficacy of the boost. DNA vaccines alone can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses and provide modest protection against disease progression in the preclinical, nonhuman primate model when challenged with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)...

Citation:
Li B, Smith J, Butera ST, Ellenberger DL. Effects of Mutation in Protease on the Production of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Virus-Like Particles.
BioProcess J, 2006; 5(1): 43-51.

 
Integrity Testing of Normal Flow Parvovirus Filters Using Air-Liquid Based Tests

by Glen Bolton, Jason Cormier, Mani Krishnan, John Lewnard, and Herbert Lutz
Volume 5, Issue 1 (Spring 2006)

Manufacturers must demonstrate, with a very high degree of assurance, that biopharmaceutical products derived from mammalian cells or from human plasma are safe and free of viral contamination. Viruses can be physically removed from most proteins using filtration. Often air diffusion is used as a nondestructive test to ensure that a process filter is installed properly and free of defects that can compromise virus retention. In this article, theoretical models were used to relate air an liquid flow rates through integral and defective filters. The effect of defect diameter and defect density on the virus retentive ability of a filter was also modeled...

Citation:
Bolton G, Cormier J, Krishnan M, Lewnard J, Lutz H. Integrity Testing of Normal Flow Parvovirus Filters Using Air-Liquid Based Tests.
BioProcess J, 2006; 5(1): 52-57.

 
Measurement and Control of Viable Cell Density in cGMP Manufacturing Processes

by J.P. Carvell, PhD, J. Poppleton, and J.E. Dowd
Volume 5, Issue 1 (Spring 2006)

Of the available on-line biomass assays, the radio-frequency (RF) impedance method has a clear advantage for current good manufacturing process (cGMP) because it is an unambiguous reflection of viable cell bio-volume rather than the total number of cells. Although other more approximate methods are available for cells in suspension, RF impedance is practically the only on-line method available for cells in suspension, attached to microcarriers and immobolized cells at high cell densities. Data are presented to show how live cell concentrations are derived from an RF impedance-derived instrument...

Citation:
Carvell JP, Poppleton J, Dowd JE. Measurement and Control of Viable Cell Density in cGMP Manufacturing Processes.
BioProcess J, 2006; 5(1): 58-63.

 
The Establishment and Stability of the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Donor Bank for Immunoassay Validation

by Janet L. Lathey, PhD, Scott Gregory, Mike Ewell, and Scott Hickman
Volume 5, Issue 1 (Spring 2006)

The enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay is one of the most useful techniques for the immunological monitoring of vaccine trials and has increasing application as a measure of specific T-cell activation. Recently, we developed, optimized, and validated a customized ELISpot kit for the detection of interferon gamma (IFNγ) positive cells. The precision of the ELISpot was good and it varied over the range of the assay values, independent of the stimulus. Here we describe the development of a library of donors with characterized responses to the CEF peptide pool: cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and influenza (Flu); pool of 32 peptides which can be used as controls for IFNγ ELISpot and multiple immune monitoring assay validations for use in clinical trials...

Citation:
Zhang C. The Establishment and Stability of the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Donor Bank for Immunoassay Validation.
BioProcess J, 2006; 5(1): 64-68.

 
Protein, Peptide, and Amino Acid Analysis with Corona CAD: A New Universal HPLC Detector

by Darwin Asa
Volume 5, Issue 1 (Spring 2006)

The quantitative and qualitative analysis of proteins and their amino acid sequence composition is a critical operation in many researc laboratories and operations. Much protein analysis is performed using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) or fluorescence detection. Although these methods are robust and widely used, certai issues limit their utility. For example, some proteins or peptides may have a poor UV response and can be difficult to detect. Direct comparisons of protein levels when quantitated directly by UV can alson be problematic due to differences in extinction coefficients of various proteins...

Citation:
Asa D. Protein, Peptide, and Amino Acid Analysis with Corona CAD: A New Universal HPLC Detector.
BioProcess J, 2006; 5(1): 69-73.

 
<< Start < Prev 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Next > End >>

Website Sponsor
Banner
Endorsed Events
Please update your Flash Player to view content.
Please update your Flash Player to view content.
Journal on iPad